UPCOMING EVENTS
Listed below are the latest SEAoNY events - clicking the 'Register' link will enable you to signup for the event online and pay the registration fee electronically. Electronic receipts are also available.
03.10.15: SEAoNY All-Day Seminar: Digging Deeper: The Contractor's Perspective on Foundation Means and Methods
This seminar will cover the means & methods and costs of foundation design in New York City. It will focus on aspects of the design that engineers are aware of but not necessarily fully versed in how they work on their implications on the project.

8:00am - 4:30pm
New York Academy of Sciences
7 World Trade Center
250 Greenwich Street, 40th Floor
5.5 PDH credits (pending)

This All-Day Seminar is sponsored by CSi International

SEAoNY members: $275 in advance, $325 at the door
Non-members: $375 in advance, $425 at the door

Speakers and Topics:
Support of Excavation - Walter Papp, RA Consultants
Secant & Tangent Walls - Tony Mazzo, Urban
Dewatering
Rock & Soil Anchors - Gregory Biesiadecki, Langan
Piles & Caissons - John Grillo, Hayward Baker
Underpinning - John Civetta, Civetta
Ground Improvements - Sissy Nikolaou, Mueser Rutledge
Vibration & Settlement Monitoring of Structures (TPPN 10/88) - Ramon Gilsanz, GMS
Evaluation of Existing & Adjacent Buildings - Tim Lynch, DOB
PDH Credits: 5.5 | Register

03.17.15: Mitigating Disasters in the 21st Century

This lecture is presented by SEAoNY and EERI.

Speaker:Shalva Marjanishvili, DSc, PE, SE

Common engineering practice in multi-hazard design is to consider each natural hazard independently. The underlying assumption is that it is highly unlikely that one disaster will be closely followed by another. This approach dominated large part of the 20th century. Today we have a good understanding of material constitutive modeling and efficient algorithms enabling large computer programs to run analysis on powerful computers. The engineering community has made large strides in designing structures to withstand known hazards, leading to improved reliability and safety of infrastructure. This in turn has supported population growth and increased prosperity. As witness to our success, it is common in developed nations to consider it unacceptable for a disaster to cause large scale devastation. However, the nature of the disasters has proved otherwise.

It is unlikely that one extreme event will have catastrophic consequences on communities, because we know how to prepare for a single event. Instead, as experience shows, disasters are more typically comprised by one event followed by one or more other events, exposing the vulnerability of our design assumptions. The examples of multiple disasters are Indonesia (i.e., earthquake followed by tsunami followed by volcano), Haiti (i.e., earthquake followed by cholera outbreak) and Japan (i.e., earthquake followed by tsunami followed by nuclear meltdown). Current methodologies for disaster preparedness and mitigation heavily rely on known methods of statistics and reliability theories to predict the outcome to a given series of events. This approach has a number of difficulties, such as: computers are not fast enough and answers are rarely definitive enough to make an informed and timely decision.

This presentation is focused on discussing the research needs to create efficient, simple and reliable computational methodologies to mitigate the effects of multiple sequential disasters on infrastructure systems.

This event is sponsored by Porter & Yee Associates and will take place at the Center for Architecture 536 LaGuardia Pl, New York, NY 10012

Registration opens at 5:45pm. Seminar begins promptly at 6:15pm

For SEAoNY members, registration is $25 in advance or $35 at the door.
For non-members, registration is $40 in advance or $50 at the door.
For student members, registration is $5.
For EERI members, click here to receive the SEAoNY member rate.


1.5 PDH Credits

Advanced registration closes at noon the day before the event.


PDH Credits: 1.5 | Register
03.17.15: EERI Registration: Mitigating Disasters in the 21st Century

This lecture is presented by SEAoNY and EERI.

Speaker:Shalva Marjanishvili, DSc, PE, SE

Common engineering practice in multi-hazard design is to consider each natural hazard independently. The underlying assumption is that it is highly unlikely that one disaster will be closely followed by another. This approach dominated large part of the 20th century. Today we have a good understanding of material constitutive modeling and efficient algorithms enabling large computer programs to run analysis on powerful computers. The engineering community has made large strides in designing structures to withstand known hazards, leading to improved reliability and safety of infrastructure. This in turn has supported population growth and increased prosperity. As witness to our success, it is common in developed nations to consider it unacceptable for a disaster to cause large scale devastation. However, the nature of the disasters has proved otherwise.

It is unlikely that one extreme event will have catastrophic consequences on communities, because we know how to prepare for a single event. Instead, as experience shows, disasters are more typically comprised by one event followed by one or more other events, exposing the vulnerability of our design assumptions. The examples of multiple disasters are Indonesia (i.e., earthquake followed by tsunami followed by volcano), Haiti (i.e., earthquake followed by cholera outbreak) and Japan (i.e., earthquake followed by tsunami followed by nuclear meltdown). Current methodologies for disaster preparedness and mitigation heavily rely on known methods of statistics and reliability theories to predict the outcome to a given series of events. This approach has a number of difficulties, such as: computers are not fast enough and answers are rarely definitive enough to make an informed and timely decision.

This presentation is focused on discussing the research needs to create efficient, simple and reliable computational methodologies to mitigate the effects of multiple sequential disasters on infrastructure systems.

This event is sponsored by Porter & Yee Associates and will take place at the Center for Architecture 536 LaGuardia Pl, New York, NY 10012

Registration opens at 5:45pm. Seminar begins promptly at 6:15pm

Registration for EERI members is $25.00

1.5 PDH Credits

Advanced registration closes at noon the day before the event.


Register

MEMBER LOGIN

Username (email address):


Password:


Remember Me



Forgot Password?
MARCH
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031
APRIL
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930
Next Event: 03.10.15
SEAoNY All-Day Seminar: Digging Deeper: The Contractor's Perspective on Foundation Means and Methods
Details | Register

SEAoNY's Sustaining Members



















© Copyright 2015 SEAoNY | Contact Us